Are social media fights effective?

IF you own a social media account, you’ve probably been tempted to give someone a piece of your mind or to throw shade with the intention of sending out a specific message to the targeted individual.

Well, many people fall into this trap often enough, including myself when I get angry over something. I would run to social media and start posting disappointment quotes to express my feelings, obviously hoping the person reads the message and gets with the program.

However, I’m at a point where I can safely say that I have mastered the art of ignoring negative comments and avoiding social media fights – mainly because of all the anxiety it brings.

Well, hearing an opinion out loud is probably the most effective way to communicate your thoughts. Even if the person listening to you disagrees with your position, speaking aloud makes someone “seem more intellectual and emotionally warm than those whose opinions are written.”

Though, some people believe in face to face confrontation, it seems that some people enjoy those heated arguments on social media, even if it involves quarreling with a total stranger about the colour of Himalayan salt or comparing the amount of followers they have.

If you are hoping to change someone’s mind, a face-to-face meeting or phone conversation is likely the most effective way to do so. Although sometimes no matter how civil you are, ignoring the hot takes on Twitter can be difficult, especially when there is that one person who keeps pressing the wrong buttons, leaving you no choice but to participate in the all-out comment war.

According to research, the back and forth action of digital clashes can be a rush, which excites strong emotions that can lead to massive amounts of dopamine being released. This dopamine is addictive and can cause users to increase the intensity of the fights.

Some people are not worth the reply at all times, however, when the urge to comment is too much to resist, instead of starting a conflict, learn ways to start a respectful discussion instead.

I have now learned to look for civil discourse through a phone call or a coffee date rather than sending out messages on Facebook or Instagram that may not resolve the issue, but rather leaves you bitter and stressed. Or feeling defeated.

We all know that it takes no trouble at all to read an offensive post and immediately write your first thought. But before sharing a piece of your mind, think about it first.