How does creativity communicate?

Jeoffrey Mukubi

MARK Twain said, “You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus,” and honestly I have tried to put it into perspective and what I am learning is to be more patient with my creative processes.

As a child I was not preoccupied with calling myself a creative or a writer or even just understanding art and its value and why it is or is not. All I was doing is exploring things like the curiosity of a scientist and the self-assurance of youth.

I look back on these moments as an essential time where I learned how to explore and to be comfortable following my intuition. But I did not understand at some points why I had to conform to things society stood for, like fitting or getting a job.

I still do not know what the real meaning of creativity is or even how it communicates with not only its host and environment but to society as a whole. Within arts institutions and the larger art market in any sense of the word and with the majority of value is placed upon the objects that artists produce, but it is the thought process of the artist that will always be essential to the future.

Creative empathy is an imperative artistic, social, and political skill that can be practiced and our future will be shaped by those who learn to unlock the adaptability and collaborative thinking of makers. I am starting to think that art in its totality is about your unique and personal expression of the world you see around you. But you can’t express what you see and feel if you are not a creative, it just does not make sense.

People have to engage in complex creative thinking to allow them to find new solutions to challenges they face. That is why Bob Marley could heal a nation with music by joining the hands of political rivals Michael Manley and Edward Seaga, who were in-between a civil war.