Nascam doles out royalties

By Rosalia David

THE Namibian Society of Composers and Authors of Music (NASCAM) has revealed that it has paid royalties to its members, with one artist receiving a non consequential amount of N$1.15 after the royalty was divided amongst the creatives.

According to the NASCAM royalties payment report compiled by the organisation’s chief executive officer John Max, between January and December 2019, total royalties paid out to members amounted to N$664 264.00.

He said, of the total amount paid to Namibian artists, the highest given to an artist was N$14 425.00, while the lowest was N$1.15.

“The year distribution rate was N$6.90 per song played on the radio while for those who played on television it was N$42.46. If your song only appeared once on air and you are more than three creatives who have contributed to the song, then the N$6.90 will be divided amongst all,” he said.

He added that, if the song has been commercially published the publisher gets 50 percent of the amount that is distributed.

Of the royalty points collected, if the song has many contributors, the music arranger gets a share of 16 percent, songwriter and producer get 25 percent, while the music publisher gets 50 percent royalties.

Regarding submission of log sheets used to indicate the amount of times a song has played, Max said, NASCAM noted with concerned that, not all music log sheets were properly completed and sent to their office for royalties preparation.

Max further emphasised the importance of completing the log sheets saying that every song played on the radio or TV should be recorded to make sure that royalties are paid at the end of the year.

NASCAM also urged all radio stations in the country to make sure that they are submitting the music logs sheets.

He went on to say that NASCAM will not be able to pay artists if log sheets are not prioritised.

“We are also calling on all the broadcasters to provide an opportunity to assist artists with recording studios in order to have more of local music in the country. We cannot rely on international music much … that will overtake our cultural influence and national identity as a country,” he stressed.

He pointed out that the country is filled with a lot of talented musicians that deserve opportunities.

“The resources and opportunities are really not there for musicians to release enough music; therefore we encourage radio and television studios to support in the development of music in the country.”